Streaming Video Online: Think About This First

23 02 2011

I’m sure many of you have read last week’s Inside Higher Ed’s interesting, if somewhat confusing, article entitled “Hitting Pause On Class Videos”, http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2010/01/26/copyright.

In short, the story reports that the Association for Information and Media Equipment (AIME) is alleging that UCLA faculty members are infringing copyright by streaming entire (presumably) videos via their access protected course web sites. As I read the article, it appears as though UCLA is trying to defend this practice under Section 110(1), which only applies to traditional face to face (F2F) classroom settings. It is true that under that section an entire video can be show as long as it is lawfully made (p.s., rented movies are “lawfully made”).

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The content in this post was found at http://www-apps.umuc.edu/blog/collectanea/2010/02/streaming-video-online-think-a.html and was not authored by the moderators of freeforafee.com. Clicking the title link will take you to the source of the post.



YouTube, Copyright, and Higher Education: Lessons from Viacom?

23 02 2011

If you are reading blogs, it is safe to assume that you know what YouTube is. If you are reading this blog, it is probably also safe to assume that you are aware that there are significant copyright issues related to materials uploaded and available on the YouTube site. If you are working at a college or university, you are also undoubtedly aware that YouTube videos are frequently used by faculty in both F2F teaching and in online courses. The YouTube videos used range the gamut from amateur home videos to clips from commercial films to remixes of various media. The underlying copyright question is always the same: Can these videos be used in courses by faculty without infringing copyright?

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The content in this post was found at http://www-apps.umuc.edu/blog/collectanea/2010/03/youtube-copyright-and-higher-e.html and was not authored by the moderators of freeforafee.com. Clicking the title link will take you to the source of the post.



MPAA sues Hotfile for “staggering” copyright infringement

9 02 2011

File locker Hotfile.com has found itself the next target of the Motion Picture Association of America’s war on file sharing. The MPAA announced Tuesday that it had filed a lawsuit against Hotfile on behalf of 20th Century Fox, Universal Studios, Columbia Pictures, and Warner Bros. accusing the site of direct infringement, facilitating copyright infringement “on a staggering scale,” and raking in the cash while doing it.

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The content in this post was found at http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/news/2011/02/mpaa-sues-hotfile-for-copyright-infringement-on-a-staggering-scale.ars?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=rss and was not authored by the moderators of freeforafee.com. Clicking the title link will take you to the source of the post.



Senator: domain name seizures “alarmingly unprecedented”

2 02 2011

Sen. Ron Wyden (D-OR) has 10 tough questions for the department of Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), all of which can be more easily summed up in a single, blunter question: what the hell are you guys doing over there?

Wyden’s displeasure is over ICE’s Operation In Our Sites, the controversial program that began seizing Internet domain names last year, and just grabbed several more sports-related domains this week. The seizures are all signed off on by a federal judge, but the affected parties get no warning and no chance to first challenge the claim that they are running illegal businesses. In fact, in yesterday’s takedown, ICE grabbed the domain Rojadirecta.org, a site that links to live sports on the Web and has twice been declared legal by Spanish courts.

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The content in this post was found at http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/news/2011/02/senator-us-domain-name-seizures-alarmingly-unprecedented.ars?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=rss and was not authored by the moderators of freeforafee.com. Clicking the title link will take you to the source of the post.



Where have all the music pirates gone?

2 02 2011

Remember when music was cool? Back in the days of Napster, it was music that defined file-sharing; millions of people raced to listen to the most obscure artists found in the libraries of friends and strangers. . . .

Now, with iTunes ascendant, DRM vanquished, the album disaggregated, and Pandora and Spotify available on smartphones, it’s almost more trouble than it’s worth to share music online unless you happen to be the world’s biggest cheapskate (and/or a college student).

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The content in this post was found at http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/news/2011/02/where-have-all-the-music-pirates-gone.ars?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=rss and was not authored by the moderators of freeforafee.com. Clicking the title link will take you to the source of the post.



US Customs begins pre-Super Bowl online mole-whack

1 02 2011

With the Super Bowl less than a week away, US Customs has shut down a new set of Internet domain names for sites that linked to live sports broadcasts on the Web. As usual, the underlying servers were not affected and many sites are already running at new, non-US-controlled addresses.

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The content in this post was found at http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/news/2011/02/us-customs-begins-pre-super-bowl-mole-whacking.ars?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=rss and was not authored by the moderators of freeforafee.com. Clicking the title link will take you to the source of the post.



Atari’s copyright attack on RapidShare unplugged

6 01 2011

One-click file-hosting service RapidShare has won another in a string of court rulings vindicating its service, which is vilified as a pirate’s haven by many rightsholders.

Today, the company announced that the Higher Regional Court of Düsseldorf, Germany overturned an earlier ruling in favor of video game maker Atari Europe. Atari was concerned about the distribution of its game Alone in the Dark through RapidShare, and it wanted the hosting service to take responsibility for blocking such downloads. A lower Düsseldorf court had sided with Atari, but RapidShare appealed the decision and won.

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The content in this post was found at http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/news/2011/01/ataris-copyright-attack-on-rapidshare-unplugged.ars?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=rss and was not authored by the moderators of freeforafee.com. Clicking the title link will take you to the source of the post.



Ninth Circuit Says DMCA Anticircumvention Provision Gives New, Access-Prevention Right to Copyright Owners – MDY v. Blizzard, Part II

4 01 2011

As we related in Part I of this post, Blizzard Entertainment, distributor of the World of Warcraft game software and the operator of the servers that enable online game play, sought to block the use of automated game playing software by deploying anti-bot software, WoW Warden. But MDY Industries, the distributor of the Glider bot software, countered that move by re-engineering Glider to evade detection by Warden and enable users to continue access WoW’s servers while using the bot. This feature of Glider is the basis for Blizzard’s claims that MDY violated the provisions of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act that prohibit trafficking in software and other devices that enable circumvention of copyright protection technologies.

In MDY Industries, LLC v. Blizzard Entertainment, Inc., the Ninth Circuit commenced its analysis of the DMCA issues by parsing the complex interconnection between the two parallel prohibitions in the anticircumvention provisions: the prohibition in Section 1201(a) against the circumvention of a technological measure that “effectively controls access to a work protected under this title,” i.e., a copyrighted work; and the prohibition in Section 1201(b) against the circumvention of a technological measure that “effectively protects a right of a copyright owner.”
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The content in this post was found at http://newmedialaw.proskauer.com/2011/01/articles/copyright/ninth-circuit-says-dmca-anticircumvention-provision-gives-new-accessprevention-right-to-copyright-owners-mdy-v-blizzard-part-ii/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+NewMediaAndTechnologyLaw+%28New+Media+and+Technology+Law%29 and was not authored by the moderators of freeforafee.com. Clicking the title link will take you to the source of the post.



What Could Have Been Entering the Public Domain on January 1, 2011?

3 01 2011

Current US law extends copyright protections for 70 years from the date of the author’s death. But prior to the 1976 Copyright Act (which became effective in 1978), the maximum copyright term was 56 years (an initial term of 28 years, renewable for another 28 years).  Under those laws, works published in 1954 would be passing into the public domain on January 1, 2011.

This includes:

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The content in this post was found at http://indianaintellectualproperty.wordpress.com/2011/01/03/what-could-have-been-entering-the-public-domain-on-january-1-2011/ and was not authored by the moderators of freeforafee.com. Clicking the title link will take you to the source of the post.



Ninth Circuit Rules on License Conditions versus Contract Covenants in Dispute over World of Warcraft Bots – MDY v. Blizzard, Part I

3 01 2011

The dispute between MDY and Blizzard raises a multiplicity of interesting issues under copyright law and the DMCA, issues on which the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit ruled last month in MDY Industries, LLC v. Blizzard Entertainment, Inc. (9th Cir. Dec. 14, 2010). The ruling was largely, although not completely, favorable to Blizzard, but either way it is an important ruling for content and software licensors who seek to control their use of their copyrighted works.

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The content in this post was found at http://newmedialaw.proskauer.com/2011/01/articles/copyright/ninth-circuit-rules-on-license-conditions-versus-contract-covenants-in-dispute-over-world-of-warcraft-bots-mdy-v-blizzard-part-i/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+NewMediaAndTechnologyLaw+%28New+Media+and+Technology+Law%29 and was not authored by the moderators of freeforafee.com. Clicking the title link will take you to the source of the post.