EU court: Google not liable for AdWord counterfeits

23 03 2010

The European Court of Justice has ruled in favor of Google in an AdWords case over the advertising of counterfeits. The court said that the service provider—in this case, Google—could not be held liable for shady retailers buying trademarked keywords in order to sell their faux products, and that the sale of those keywords should be left open to third parties.

Google has been dealing with this case in Europe for at least five years, ever since luxury retailer Louis Vuitton won a lawsuit against AdWords in France. The search giant had allowed retailers selling fake LV wares to buy keywords like “Louis Vuitton replicas” and “Louis Vuitton fakes.” The design house alleged that Google didn’t have the right to sell the keywords using their brand name, and the court agreed. Google appealed the ruling and took it to Europe’s highest court, where it worked its way through the system for nearly two more years before Tuesday’s ruling.

Read the rest of this article...


The content in this post was found at http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/news/2010/03/eu-court-google-not-liable-for-adword-counterfeits.ars?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=rss and was not authored by the moderators of freeforafee.com. Clicking the title link will take you to the source of the post.



Norwegian Court Cannot Order ISP to Block Pirate Bay

18 03 2010
A NORWEGIAN court has rejected a record industry appeal against telecoms operator Telenor for refusing to block access to popular file sharing website The Pirate Bay, a plaintiff says. The Oslo court of appeal said that it is not currently possible, under Norwegian law, for a judge to order an internet service provider to halt traffic to websites from which illegal downloading happens.

more

The content in this post was found at http://www.news.com.au/technology/norway-court-rejects-industry-bid-to-block-the-pirate-bay/story-e6frfro0-1225829046274 and was not authored by the moderators of freeforafee.com. Clicking the title link will take you to the source of the post.



New ACTA leak shows major resistance to US-style DRM rules

2 03 2010

The leaks keep coming for the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA). A new leak from Europe has revealed the inner workings of the negotiating process through a 40+ page document showing each country’s positions on key provisions of the treaty.

While most of the negotiating is quite technical, what stands out most sharply is the international resistance to the US-drafted proposals on DRM “anticircumvention” rules. Let’s take a look at some of the key differences among parties.

Read the rest of this article...


The content in this post was found at http://feeds.arstechnica.com/arstechnica/BAaf and was not authored by the moderators of freeforafee.com. Clicking the title link will take you to the source of the post.



feature: Studios crushed: ISP can’t be forced to play copyright cop

4 02 2010


In a definitive defeat for film studios—and in a first case of its kind worldwide—Australia’s Federal Court has ruled that ISPs have no obligation to act on copyright infringement notices or to disconnect subscribers after receiving multiple letters. If copyright holders want justice for illegal file-sharing, they need to start by targeting the right people: those who committed the infringement.

The ruling handed down today by Judge J. Cowdroy aims to be nothing less than magisterial: in 200 pages, it examines the issue from every possible angle because of the “obvious importance of these proceedings to the law of copyright both in this country and possibly overseas.”

Read the rest of this article...



The content in this post was found at http://feeds.arstechnica.com/arstechnica/BAaf and was not authored by the moderators of freeforafee.com. Clicking the title link will take you to the source of the post.



Italy preparing to hold YouTube, others liable for uploads

3 02 2010

User-generated content sites have always resisted the idea that they should be regulated like traditional broadcasters, but Italy has been the democracy that has gone furthest in that direction. The move toward regulation continues with a new policy that could force sites like YouTube to obtain TV licenses from the Italian government. Such sites could also be fully liable for copyright infringement and libelous or illegal material posted by users.

The Italian government has already gone after Google in a highly public fashion, suing several top executives over a YouTube video that showed classmates abusing a student with Down’s Syndrome. In that case, the argument was that Google had a duty to screen such material and keep it from appearing on the site—a claim that Google and others have always said would make user-generated content sites almost impossible to run.

Read the rest of this article...



The content in this post was found at http://feeds.arstechnica.com/arstechnica/BAaf and was not authored by the moderators of freeforafee.com. Clicking the title link will take you to the source of the post.



Good rundown on Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA) by Michael Geist

25 01 2010

Michael Geist offers us a useful background on the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA) talks happening now in Mexico in The ACTA Guide, Part One: The Talks To-Date


The content in this post was found at http://www.michaelgeist.ca/content/view/4725/125/ and was not authored by the moderators of freeforafee.com. Clicking the title link will take you to the source of the post.



Adding up the explanations for ACTA’s “shameful secret”

15 01 2010

Why is an intellectual property treaty being negotiated in the name of the US public kept quiet as a matter of national security and treated as “some shameful secret”?

Solid information on the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA) has been hard to come by, but Google on Monday hosted a panel discussion on ACTA at its DC offices. Much of the discussion focused on transparency, and why there’s so little of it on ACTA, even from an administration that has made transparency one of its key goals.

The reason for that was obvious: there’s little of substance that’s known about the treaty, and those lawyers in the room and on the panel who had seen one small part of it were under a nondisclosure agreement.

Read the rest of this article...


The content in this post was found at http://feeds.arstechnica.com/arstechnica/BAaf and was not authored by the moderators of freeforafee.com. Clicking the title link will take you to the source of the post.



Internet pirates find ‘bulletproof’ havens for illegal file sharing (Rob Holmes featured)

6 01 2010
  • The Guardian, Tuesday 5 January 2010 (Bobbie Johnson, technology correspondent)

Internet pirates are moving away from safe havens such as Sweden to new territories that include China and Ukraine, as they try to avoid prosecution for illegal file sharing, according to experts.

The content in this post was found at http://www.guardian.co.uk/technology/2010/jan/05/internet-piracy-bulletproof and was not authored by the moderators of freeforafee.com. Clicking the title link will take you to the source of the post.



Obama admin: Mandated exemptions can strengthen copyright

30 12 2009

The Obama administration has offered up a strange mix of copyright policies in its first year (both ACTA and Creative Commons, for instance), but it has at least made clear that “better copyright law” does not always mean “more copyright protection.” In the middle of December, for instance, the administration took a stand in support of a World Intellectual Property Organization treaty on copyright exceptions for the blind. The final bit of the US statement of support is worth quoting in full (emphasis added):

We recognize that some in the international copyright community believe that any international consensus on substantive limitations and exceptions to copyright law would weaken international copyright law. The United States does not share that point of view. The United States is committed to both better exceptions in copyright law and better enforcement of copyright law. Indeed, as we work with countries to establish consensus on proper, basic exceptions within copyright law, we will ask countries to work with us to improve the enforcement of copyright. This is part and parcel of a balanced international system of intellectual property.

It’s a call for “balanced” copyright taken directly to the WIPO—and it’s one opposed by the deepest-pocketed copyright holders. Here’s why.

Read the rest of this article...



The content in this post was found at http://feeds.arstechnica.com/arstechnica/BAaf and was not authored by the moderators of freeforafee.com. Clicking the title link will take you to the source of the post.



Google defends itself in Italian video bullying case

20 12 2009

The person uploading videos to YouTube is responsible for getting the consent of the people in them—not the company hosting the videos. Google repeatedly made that point in Italy this week as part of its closing arguments in a case over privacy, triggered by a controversial video of some Italian teenagers bullying a handicapped boy. Depending on which way the Italian court sways, the final decision could affect how online video services are run or served in Italy.

The story started in 2006 with a group of bored high schoolers who had a video-capable cell phone. The teens decided to harass another youth with Down Syndrome, both verbally and by hitting him on the head with a box of tissues. They recorded video of the abuse and then put the video online using Google Video Italia.

Read the rest of this article...



The content in this post was found at http://feeds.arstechnica.com/arstechnica/BAaf and was not authored by the moderators of freeforafee.com. Clicking the title link will take you to the source of the post.